Tag Archives: wild edible

Queen Anne’s Lace and Feral Apple Jelly

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I feel my best when I’m outside, among the trees, in a meadow, or beside a stream. Where I can see the sun shining, feel the wind blowing, and hear the birds singing.

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Add some wild edibles or medicinal plants to harvest and I’m in heaven.

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Yesterday we picked Queen Anne’s Lace, also known as wild carrot, latin name: Daucus carota.

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There was a wild apple tree along the edge of the field and we picked a few that were within our reach.

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I pulled out my grandfather’s Kabar and sliced one for us to eat right there beneath the tree. I can still see him doing this, removing the knife from his pocket whenever the need arose and peeling the blade out. Preparedness goes a long way in this life.

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Once home, we placed the flower heads out to let the critters wander away and then steeped the blossoms in boiled water.

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We chopped the little apples into chunks and placed them in water to boil.

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We combined the juice and the wild carrot tea, added some sugar and reluctantly, some pectin and our yield is 6 half pints of Queen Anne’s Lace and wild apple jelly.

And we’ll think of those fragrant apples warming in the sun and the field of seemingly endless white blossoms when we slather this jelly on toast or biscuits.

Get outside and find something wild.

 

 

 

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Mulberry Rhubarb Crumb Cake

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Mulberry (Morus rubra) is a deciduous tree that grows wild here in New England. If you’re walking along and you see the ground covered in what looks like black berries, look up.

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The trees can grow up to 70 feet tall.

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The blackberry-like fruit is ripe for picking in early summer and varies in flavor from tree to tree.

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The berries of the red mulberry tree start out white, turn pink then red and finally to a purple color. Make sure to only harvest the ripe fruit.

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We foraged the berries that would have otherwise fallen to the ground.

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The question was, what to make with these beauties?

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Since we had some rhubarb fresh from the garden, we decided on crumb cake.

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A cup each of rhubarb and mulberries…

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folded into a cake batter…

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Sprinkled with a crumb topping and baked to perfection.

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Slice and enjoy!

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Mulberry Rhubarb Crumb Cake

  • Servings: makes 12 bars
  • Print

Crumb

  • 5 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup packed brown sugar
  • pinch of salt

Cake

  • 8 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 cup chopped rhubarb
  • 1 cup mulberries

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Grease a 9×9 baking pan. Prepare crumb topping by placing all the ingredients into a bowl and stirring until crumbly.

In a large bowl, cream butter and sugars. Add eggs, one at a time until fully incorporated. Stir in vanilla. In another bowl, whisk flour, salt and baking powder and add to the creamed butter mixture. Fold in chopped rhubarb and mulberries.

Place cake batter into prepared baking pan and cover with crumb topping.

Bake for 45 minutes until golden brown.

Let cool on a wire rack before slicing.